“Education has set me free.”

At the age of 25 Natasha Cauley hit rock bottom. She sat in the Emergency Support Shelter with her two boys and no money. She said to herself, “I won’t accept this, it’s not good enough.”

After struggling through life for many years Natasha is using education to improve the lives of her two boys and herself. She made up her mind she won’t stop going to school until her standard of life is “good enough” to break the cycle of family uncertainty and poverty.

Natasha’s story highlights how important it is to graduate from high school.

Natasha’s troubles started with an uncertain home life. After attending multiple middle and high schools in Longview and outside the area Natasha was having trouble fitting into yet another new school.

Natasha earned good grades throughout school, but problems at home made life unbearable. “I’ll just drop out of high school, get my GED, and everything will be fine,” she thought.

With her mother’s written permission (she was told her father had passed away) Natasha dropped out of high school. Over the course of 12 months Natasha went from living with her mother and being a high school student to being a dropout pregnant with her first child.

Living with her boyfriend’s parents, and with no plans to go back to school, trouble arrived quickly. Complications with her pregnancy caused the baby to be born about 6 weeks prematurely. Her new baby boy Tristan weighed a little over 3 pounds at birth. The medical complications caused problems for Natasha too, she spent several weeks recovering while Tristan fought for life in the neonatal unit.

For two years after Tristan was born Natasha worked low level, low paying jobs. She didn’t qualify for better jobs without a high school diploma. She and her boyfriend broke up around Tristan’s third birthday.

Natasha started living with friends in Longview, and at about the same time noticed something wasn’t quite right with Tristan. Doctors said Tristan was fine. Being born prematurely had set Tristan back, but he would catch up over time the doctor said.

It wasn’t until after enrolling Tristan at Kessler Elementary that she received confirmation something else might be wrong. School personnel asked Natasha to take Tristan to a specialist – where she found out Tristan has autism.

Life was tough. Natasha, now 22 years old with an autistic son, was working at the Kelso Red Lion making coffee and waiting tables in the restaurant. Then she became pregnant with her second child. Nine months later William was born.

With a second child Natasha’s life became miserable. She stayed in the house for days at a time taking care of William, while Tristan was often agitated or crying. She suffered from post-partum depression, and felt cut off from the community.

And just when Natasha felt at her wits end, she and her boyfriend split up after a domestic dispute. Natasha took her two boys and a duffle bag of clothes to the Emergency Support Shelter (ESS) in Longview.

“Friends will only help for so long, then you need to help yourself,” Natasha recounted.

A counselor at the ESS gave Natasha a piece of paper and asked her to write some basic, achievable goals. Imagine trying to write goals when you don’t know where your next meal will come from.

With no driver’s license, no car, no job, no high school diploma and two boys to raise Natasha hit rock bottom. She thought something had to drastically change or she’d be forced to accept a life of hardship.

“I needed to fix things,” she said – it was her defining moment. 

The counselor started Natasha working on short-term goals with a promise that once the goals were achieved a new list of goals would be written down.

She wrote down basic needs – get a driver’s license, find a job and get an apartment. At the bottom of the list was education, she wanted to get her high school diploma.

Natasha completed almost all the goals in 90 days.

With her initial goals mostly done Natasha’s focus came back to education. She went to Lower Columbia College and earned her high school diploma in three months – but that wasn’t enough.

She signed up for more classes at LCC with a goal of getting her associate of arts (AA) degree. With one quarter remaining she needed to pass a math class to get her AA degree – and flunked the course.

Instead of quitting she re-took the class and received an “A”, and earned her AA degree. But she wanted a better life for her family, so she enrolled at WSU – Vancouver.

Natasha Cauley will graduate from WSU – Vancouver with a bachelor’s degree in English in the spring of 2019. She reunited with her past boyfriend, William’s father, and life is good. She will be pursuing her master’s degree come next fall.

About her education Natasha said, “Before going back to school I was sleep walking through life. Education has set me free.”

2018-11-19T17:08:28+00:00November 19th, 2018|

Longview teachers have class

We’re proud of our educators and are taking this opportunity to introduce you to two of them, in their own words. They have different interests but share a passion for preparing Longview students for successful futures!

This is a supplement to the Longview Public Schools annual report. Both Gail Wells and Sam Kell are featured in the printed version of the annual report.  

Gail Wells, math teacher, Monticello Middle School.

Gail Wells believes everyone can do math. She works the room and uses technology to gauge how much each student understands, even those who never raise their hands.

Where did you grow up and go to school? I was born in North Dakota and grew up in Federal Way, Washington. I was in the first graduating class at Thomas Jefferson High School in Auburn and went to Western Washington University for a degree in home economics.

How did you get from home economics to math? My passion was food and nutrition, but math is completely entrenched in home economics—measuring food, finance, sewing …

Why do people think math is so hard? Society doesn’t allow people not to be “readers,” but for some reason it’s OK to not be good at math. The mindset should be that “I can do it,” because everyone can.

How long have you been teaching? Twenty-six or 27 years—10 years at St. Helens and 10 years at Robert Gray, with four years as a math coach at Kessler and Robert Gray. Now I’m finishing at Monticello Middle School.

How has teaching math changed? When I was in school, it was, “Here is how you do it. Now copy what I do.” We don’t do that anymore. Instead of just handing students an algorithm or a way to do something, we do a lot of concrete building of understanding before moving to the abstract.

What is the best thing about being a teacher? That look on a student’s face when they “get it”—it’s priceless.

What are some of the keys to being a good teacher? Number one is understanding what the goal is. For me it’s the state standards—I have to know what the students need to know. Also …

  • Making sure the students get the needed feedback so they can self-evaluate.
  • Being ready when they walk through the door—knowing where you’re going and how to get there, not just turning the page on the book and teaching them what’s on the next page.
  • Adjusting if the students are not getting it.

The big thing here at Monticello is I have an amazing teaching partner, Phil Hartley. We collaborate, do assessments, reflect on student work, talk about the goals and are transparent about our work. Today we are going to share kids and do some interventions, so we can get them where they need to be right now.

To be a good teacher, it’s everything, including a great administration that supports you. It’s not just one thing.

What advice do you have for new teachers? Don’t think you already know everything. I’ve been teaching for 26 or 27 years, and every year I learn something new. Every year I get better. So listen to your colleagues, listen to your students, and be willing to adapt. Be a part of the team.

What’s something people might not know about you? I’ve been making gingerbread houses for 30 years. I have two sons who were in the armed service—one still is. I send gingerbread houses to Afghanistan and Bosnia. My daughter taught English in South Korea, so I sent one to her.

What would you tell the community about what life is like in school? When those kids come up the stairs and say hi to me, it’s wonderful. It’s the best place in the world to work.

What are students like today? Students are considerate of each other. They want to do their best—they want to succeed.

Anything else? This is my last year of teaching. I want to have more time with my family and visit my grandchildren—I have six. My career as a teacher has been an amazing journey. I feel deeply blessed by every student I’ve ever had.

 

 

Sam Kell, industrial arts teacher, Mark Morris High School

Sam Kell practices what he teaches. At school, he introduces pre-apprenticeship students (pg. 3) to technical skills like carpentry. In his spare time, he works on his own fixer-upper house.

Where did you grow up and go to school? I spent my childhood in Kelso and Longview, and went to Catlin Elementary, Columbia Heights Elementary, Cascade Middle School and Mark Morris High School. I spent one year at Lower Columbia College and finished my final three years at Central Washington University in the industrial arts program.

Why did you get into teaching? I always liked working with people and going through the learning process. My mom is a pre-school teacher.

Who introduced you to industrial arts? My dad is a self-employed residential contractor. He flips houses and owns rentals. I started working with my dad when I was 10 or 11 years old. I was just a helping hand with sheetrock and roofs. In school I excelled in shop classes and was happiest in project-based learning.

What’s the best part about being a teacher? Building relationships with the students. Teaching is all about the relationships and the growth.

What are the students of today like? They are hard-working and task driven. People may assume students never get off their smartphone or think, “It’s not like when we were in school.” But I still see the drive in students to get things done. Sometimes it takes different teaching styles to motivate different students.

What is one thing you want to teach every student? One thing I’d like to teach every student is lifelong learning and self-evaluation. To be able to reflect on the job you just completed is a very important skill no matter what you do. I learned a long time ago, “reflect and do better.”

What would you like people to know about school? School is about learning, and failure is okay.

 Do you have hobbies? I love hunting, fishing and hiking, and I share season tickets to the Trailblazers. I’ve been a Blazers fan since elementary school. I watched Michael Jordan and Clyde Drexler play. I also own a house in Kelso—it’s a fixer upper.

 Anything else? It’s important for young people in our community to recognize their own skills and recognize what Longview has to offer. Longview is a great place.

2018-11-07T15:28:50+00:00November 6th, 2018|

Northlake Elementary students love Harvest Festival!

Colder weather is on it’s way which means it’s time to harvest the garden bounty.

On Friday, October 5 kids at the Northlake Elementary Harvest Festival were laughing and having fun while pressing freshly harvested apples into cider. Other students were enjoying a taste of roasted veggies harvested from Northlake’s garden, while some kids prepared squash for cooking.

After singing songs, eating healthy food from the garden and drinking just pressed apple cider kids ran through a hay bale obstacle course.

Lower Columbia School Gardens (LCSG) introduces and connects kids to food in a hands-on and fun way. LCSG also coordinates curriculum so kids can be exposed to the world of fresh fruit and vegetables.

According to the Lower Columbia School Gardens web site (lowercolumbiaschoolgardens.org), over 4,000 kids each year are taught about cooking and nutrition through hands-on activities in one of the school gardens.

 

 

2018-10-08T11:22:58+00:00October 8th, 2018|

Welcome to School Year 2018-2019!

Dear Families, Staff and Community Partners,

Welcome to School Year 2018-2019!

We are focused on learning and attendance at Northlake. Reading, writing and math are our academic focus areas.  We are using Conscious Discipline as our community building and social skills building approach. You can find out more information about Conscious Discipline online. We have a new curriculum for math, and we are using reading, writing, speaking and listening skills throughout the day. We are positively reinforcing students who arrive on time and arrive ready to learn!

We believe that your support is crucial to our success. We have a group of volunteers who work in our school and in the garden! Thanks to everyone who has donated their time or resources to support our students. It does take a whole village to raise a child, and we have more than 325 students at this time!

Some tips for making sure students are ready for school are:

  • Make sure students get adequate rest each night
  • Make sure students eat breakfast at home and or at school
  • Make sure students are dressed appropriately for school

Don’t forget to stop by our Little Libraries. Donated to us by the Rotary Club, these libraries let you leave a book and take a book. Also, if you have extra books at home, we are always welcome to donate books to us.  Another good piece of information is that if students read 20 minutes a night at home, they are far more likely to be good readers and to be on track to graduate high school and beyond. Research shows that if children read 20 minutes a day, they are exposed to 1.8 million words per year, and will score in the 90th percentile of standardized tests. If children read 5 minutes a day, they are exposed to 282,000 words per year and are predicted to score in the 50th percentile. That is why, even if your student does not have homework, we are urging everyone to read at home at least 20 minutes a day.

You are always welcome at Northlake, and we appreciate all of your feedback and support!

Sincerely Yours,

Dr. Cora Lazo, Principal

2018-10-05T15:42:14+00:00October 5th, 2018|

LPS celebrates summer reading!

Longview Public Schools Superintendent Dan Zorn and School Board member Phil Jurmu set the pace at Longview’s Go Fourth parade.

While serving as grand marshal of the 2018 Go Fourth parade, Superintendent Dan Zorn and his crew of LPS staff, board members, family and friends passed out thousands of bookmarks encouraging everyone to read this summer.

The bookmarks include a link to “Superintendent Storytime,” where Dr. Zorn shares several of his favorite children’s books.

 

2018-07-09T08:05:38+00:00July 5th, 2018|

LPS graduates take diverse paths: Becky Grubbs, MMHS

Young people sample lots of activities in high school, and by the time they graduate each has a unique set of experiences to call their own. We asked three members of Longview’s class of 2018 to share something about their high school careers, a piece of advice and their post-graduation plans.

MMHS grad Becky Grubbs

Mark Morris grad Becky Grubbs

Mark Morris High School: Hardwired to help

Becky Grubbs seems hardwired for volunteering.

“I’ve been doing non-profit work since I was 18 months old,” said
the senior, describing those early times with her grandparents
at FISH of Cowlitz County, which distributes food and other services.

This year and last, Becky received Volunteer of the Year honors from the Cowlitz-Wahkiakum United Way.

Becky began volunteering at the United Way as a sophomore and soon was helping plan events, like the Day of Caring campaign. This year she worked with LPS to implement a literacy program that put 100 Mark Morris and R.A. Long students in third grade classrooms where they encouraged the younger students to read for fun.

“Becky took it on as her pet project … and set up student teams at the high schools,” said Brooke Fisher-Clark, United Way executive director. “It was really magical to see that partnership.”

Becky said volunteer work has taught her that there is always a way to help.

“United Way really helped me find out how to contribute,” she said.

Next steps: Finish an associate’s degree in business at Lower Columbia College and then pursue a four-year degree to become a financial planner or accountant.

Advice for younger students: “I would suggest they look for opportunities for things they can do in their own community. There’s always some way to help. You can always find something to do.”

Click here to read about Discovery graduate Natalie Rodriguez .

Click here to read about R.A. Long graduate Hamzah Amjad.

*

Story originally appeared in the Summer 2018 issue of the Longview Schools Review.

2018-06-21T14:54:44+00:00June 21st, 2018|

LPS grads take diverse paths: Hamzah Amjad, R.A. Long

Young people sample lots of activities in high school, and by the time they graduate each has a unique set of experiences to call their own. We asked three members of Longview’s class of 2018 to share something about their high school careers, a piece of advice and their post-graduation plans.

R.A. Long High School: Intent on STEM

R.A. Long grad Hamzah Amjad

R.A. Long grad Hamzah Amjad

From Hamzah Amjad’s perspective, having technology isn’t enough.

“It can be used to solve most of the world’s problems,” he said. “We just haven’t yet figured out how to help people who need it.”

Hamzah is preparing to do just that. In April, he was among 49 Washington high school seniors—one from each legislative district—who signed letters of intent to pursue careers in STEM—science, technology, engineering and mathematics. In September, he will begin engineering studies at the University of Washington.

“I like things that manifest into real-life scenarios,” he said, describing how his calculus and AP statistics classes helped him see real-world applications for theoretical material.

Hamzah points to medicines that are designed to cure cancer but perhaps aren’t used in the most efficient way. And he mused about artificial intelligence in cars—couldn’t it be used to prevent vehicle accidents?

His teachers anticipate he will make a difference.

“Hamzah is a phenomenal person who is always ‘on his game,’ and he carries himself with a humility that people are drawn to,” said math teacher Paul Jeffries. “He is committed to his future and will be successful, because he doesn’t know how else to be.”

Next steps: Study engineering at University of Washington.

Advice for younger students: “Everyone’s different, so you have to find your own way … but ask for help if you need it.”

Click here to read about Discovery graduate Natalie Rodriguez.

Click here to read about Mark Morris graduate Becky Grubbs.

*

Story originally appeared in the Summer 2018 issue of the Longview Schools Review.

2018-06-21T12:09:40+00:00June 21st, 2018|

LPS grads take diverse paths: Hamzah Amjad, R.A. Long

Young people sample lots of activities in high school, and by the time they graduate each has a unique set of experiences to call their own. We asked three members of Longview’s class of 2018 to share something about their high school careers, a piece of advice and their post-graduation plans.

R.A. Long High School: Intent on STEM

R.A. Long grad Hamzah Amjad

R.A. Long grad Hamzah Amjad

From Hamzah Amjad’s perspective, having technology isn’t enough.

“It can be used to solve most of the world’s problems,” he said. “We just haven’t yet figured out how to help people who need it.”

Hamzah is preparing to do just that. In April, he was among 49 Washington high school seniors—one from each legislative district—who signed letters of intent to pursue careers in STEM—science, technology, engineering and mathematics. In September, he will begin engineering studies at the University of Washington.

“I like things that manifest into real-life scenarios,” he said, describing how his calculus and AP statistics classes helped him see real-world applications for theoretical material.

Hamzah points to medicines that are designed to cure cancer but perhaps aren’t used in the most efficient way. And he mused about artificial intelligence in cars—couldn’t it be used to prevent vehicle accidents?

His teachers anticipate he will make a difference.

“Hamzah is a phenomenal person who is always ‘on his game,’ and he carries himself with a humility that people are drawn to,” said math teacher Paul Jeffries. “He is committed to his future and will be successful, because he doesn’t know how else to be.”

Next steps: Study engineering at University of Washington.

Advice for younger students: “Everyone’s different, so you have to find your own way … but ask for help if you need it.”

Click here to read about Discovery graduate Natalie Rodriguez.

Click here to read about Mark Morris graduate Becky Grubbs.

*

Story originally appeared in the Summer 2018 issue of the Longview Schools Review.

2018-06-21T12:09:40+00:00June 21st, 2018|

LPS graduates take diverse paths: Natalie Rodriguez, Discovery

Young people sample lots of activities in high school, and by the time they graduate each has a unique set of experiences to call their own. We asked three members of Longview’s class of 2018 to share something about their high school careers, a piece of advice and their post-graduation plans.

Discovery High School: Finding her wings

DHS grad Natalie Rodriguez

Discovery grad Natalie Rodriguez

After moving back to Longview from Texas in her sophomore year, Natalie Rodriguez’s plan was to finish high school online so she could avoid people.

Then the self-described “really, really shy” student heard about Discovery, Longview’s alternative high school, and gave it a try.

When Natalie was required to make her first presentation, Discovery teacher Tamra Higgins nudged her through it.

“Ms. Higgins was like, ‘It’ll be OK. You’ll be fine,’” Natalie recalled—and found out she was.

She continued trying new things, including a library science class at R.A. Long and volunteer work at Monticello Middle School. Along the way, she found a passion for libraries.

“I realized if you work in a library, you’re helping people,” she said.
“Libraries are like hospitals for the mind.”

Higgins and English teacher Ron Moore agreed that Natalie has evolved into a whole new student.

“Natalie consistently asked some of the best questions and offered the deepest and most sophisticated insights,” Moore said. “She became a class leader and risk taker—miles away from that timid girl who was hesitant to put her toe in the water.”

Next steps: Start at Lower Columbia College, preparing for a career as a library technician.

Advice for younger students:
“If you’re on a cliff and you need to jump, but you’re too scared to jump, find some wings, staple them on—and just jump.”

Click here to read about Mark Morris graduate Becky Grubbs.

Click here to read about R.A. Long graduate Hamzah Amjad.

*

Story originally appeared in the Summer 2018 issue of the Longview Schools Review.

2018-06-21T14:53:29+00:00June 21st, 2018|
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