lnixon

About lnixon

This author has not yet filled in any details.
So far lnixon has created 76 blog entries.

Capital facilities bond proposal approved

At the April 8, 2019 school board meeting, the board unanimously approved the capital facilities bond proposal totaling $115 million. Projects in this proposal will touch every school and include:

  • Mint Valley Elementary School replacement – $43 million
  • Northlake Elementary School replacement – $43 million
  • Safety and Security upgrades for all schools – $4.2 million
  • Career Technical/Vocational upgrades at R.A. Long and Mark Morris high schools – $8.4 million
  • Memorial Stadium upgrades – $7 million
  • Large facility repair projects – $9.4 million

Find out more here.

2019-04-16T16:10:16-07:00April 16th, 2019|

Application window open for Highly Capable student testing

Applications are now being accepted for the district’s annual Highly Capable Program identification process. To have a student evaluated for this program, parents/guardians give permission by completing the High Capable Permission Form and returning it to the student’s school. Permission forms are due Friday, March 15, 2019.

Cognitive Ability Testing (CogAT) will commence March-April 2019. The selection team will review student data April-May 2019. Testing results will be mailed in May 2019.

2019-03-04T17:15:11-07:00March 4th, 2019|

Elementary Science Day Camp offered

The R.A. Long Science Olympiad Club presents the 6th Annual Elementary Science Day Camp for 3rd, 4th, and 5th graders in Cowlitz County. There are two sessions to pick from –  Monday, February 18, 2019, 8am – 2pm (there is no school that day) and/or Saturday, March 23, 2019, 8am-2pm.

Students will explore a variety of scientific concepts including physics, chemistry, biology. High school students will run the experiments and offer hands-on lab activities and demonstrations.  Experiments include catapults, robotics, code breakers, lava lamps, footprinting, chemical reactions, lasers, and rockets.

The camp will be held at R.A. Long, Room 130; the cost is $49, payable at the ASB office during school hours or on the day of the camp. Please complete the registration form and return to R.A. Long High School ASB office during school hours.

2019-02-12T15:44:32-07:00February 12th, 2019|

Winter break early release and January back-to-school

Longview students will be released early on Friday, December 21, 2018 to begin their winter vacation.  Release times are:

  • Elementary schools – two hours earlier than regular release time
  • Cascade – 11:45am release
  • Monticello – 11:50am release
  • Mt. Solo – 11:55am release
  • High schools – 11:50am release

Students return back to school on Wednesday, January 2, 2019. Students will be released one hour early on that day.

Broadway Learning Center has no school on Friday, Dec. 21. School resumes for Broadway students on Thursday, January 3, 2019.

 

2019-01-02T17:27:18-07:00December 20th, 2018|

Welcome to School Year 2018-2019!

Dear Families, Staff and Community Partners,

Welcome to School Year 2018-2019!

We are focused on learning and attendance at Northlake. Reading, writing and math are our academic focus areas.  We are using Conscious Discipline as our community building and social skills building approach. You can find out more information about Conscious Discipline online. We have a new curriculum for math, and we are using reading, writing, speaking and listening skills throughout the day. We are positively reinforcing students who arrive on time and arrive ready to learn!

We believe that your support is crucial to our success. We have a group of volunteers who work in our school and in the garden! Thanks to everyone who has donated their time or resources to support our students. It does take a whole village to raise a child, and we have more than 325 students at this time!

Some tips for making sure students are ready for school are:

  • Make sure students get adequate rest each night
  • Make sure students eat breakfast at home and or at school
  • Make sure students are dressed appropriately for school

Don’t forget to stop by our Little Libraries. Donated to us by the Rotary Club, these libraries let you leave a book and take a book. Also, if you have extra books at home, we are always welcome to donate books to us.  Another good piece of information is that if students read 20 minutes a night at home, they are far more likely to be good readers and to be on track to graduate high school and beyond. Research shows that if children read 20 minutes a day, they are exposed to 1.8 million words per year, and will score in the 90th percentile of standardized tests. If children read 5 minutes a day, they are exposed to 282,000 words per year and are predicted to score in the 50th percentile. That is why, even if your student does not have homework, we are urging everyone to read at home at least 20 minutes a day.

You are always welcome at Northlake, and we appreciate all of your feedback and support!

Sincerely Yours,

Dr. Cora Lazo, Principal

2018-10-05T15:42:14-07:00October 5th, 2018|

LPS celebrates summer reading!

Longview Public Schools Superintendent Dan Zorn and School Board member Phil Jurmu set the pace at Longview’s Go Fourth parade.

While serving as grand marshal of the 2018 Go Fourth parade, Superintendent Dan Zorn and his crew of LPS staff, board members, family and friends passed out thousands of bookmarks encouraging everyone to read this summer.

The bookmarks include a link to “Superintendent Storytime,” where Dr. Zorn shares several of his favorite children’s books.

 

2018-07-09T08:05:38-07:00July 5th, 2018|

LPS graduates take diverse paths: Becky Grubbs, MMHS

Young people sample lots of activities in high school, and by the time they graduate each has a unique set of experiences to call their own. We asked three members of Longview’s class of 2018 to share something about their high school careers, a piece of advice and their post-graduation plans.

MMHS grad Becky Grubbs

Mark Morris grad Becky Grubbs

Mark Morris High School: Hardwired to help

Becky Grubbs seems hardwired for volunteering.

“I’ve been doing non-profit work since I was 18 months old,” said
the senior, describing those early times with her grandparents
at FISH of Cowlitz County, which distributes food and other services.

This year and last, Becky received Volunteer of the Year honors from the Cowlitz-Wahkiakum United Way.

Becky began volunteering at the United Way as a sophomore and soon was helping plan events, like the Day of Caring campaign. This year she worked with LPS to implement a literacy program that put 100 Mark Morris and R.A. Long students in third grade classrooms where they encouraged the younger students to read for fun.

“Becky took it on as her pet project … and set up student teams at the high schools,” said Brooke Fisher-Clark, United Way executive director. “It was really magical to see that partnership.”

Becky said volunteer work has taught her that there is always a way to help.

“United Way really helped me find out how to contribute,” she said.

Next steps: Finish an associate’s degree in business at Lower Columbia College and then pursue a four-year degree to become a financial planner or accountant.

Advice for younger students: “I would suggest they look for opportunities for things they can do in their own community. There’s always some way to help. You can always find something to do.”

Click here to read about Discovery graduate Natalie Rodriguez .

Click here to read about R.A. Long graduate Hamzah Amjad.

*

Story originally appeared in the Summer 2018 issue of the Longview Schools Review.

2018-06-21T14:54:44-07:00June 21st, 2018|

LPS grads take diverse paths: Hamzah Amjad, R.A. Long

Young people sample lots of activities in high school, and by the time they graduate each has a unique set of experiences to call their own. We asked three members of Longview’s class of 2018 to share something about their high school careers, a piece of advice and their post-graduation plans.

R.A. Long High School: Intent on STEM

R.A. Long grad Hamzah Amjad

R.A. Long grad Hamzah Amjad

From Hamzah Amjad’s perspective, having technology isn’t enough.

“It can be used to solve most of the world’s problems,” he said. “We just haven’t yet figured out how to help people who need it.”

Hamzah is preparing to do just that. In April, he was among 49 Washington high school seniors—one from each legislative district—who signed letters of intent to pursue careers in STEM—science, technology, engineering and mathematics. In September, he will begin engineering studies at the University of Washington.

“I like things that manifest into real-life scenarios,” he said, describing how his calculus and AP statistics classes helped him see real-world applications for theoretical material.

Hamzah points to medicines that are designed to cure cancer but perhaps aren’t used in the most efficient way. And he mused about artificial intelligence in cars—couldn’t it be used to prevent vehicle accidents?

His teachers anticipate he will make a difference.

“Hamzah is a phenomenal person who is always ‘on his game,’ and he carries himself with a humility that people are drawn to,” said math teacher Paul Jeffries. “He is committed to his future and will be successful, because he doesn’t know how else to be.”

Next steps: Study engineering at University of Washington.

Advice for younger students: “Everyone’s different, so you have to find your own way … but ask for help if you need it.”

Click here to read about Discovery graduate Natalie Rodriguez.

Click here to read about Mark Morris graduate Becky Grubbs.

*

Story originally appeared in the Summer 2018 issue of the Longview Schools Review.

2018-06-21T12:09:40-07:00June 21st, 2018|

LPS grads take diverse paths: Hamzah Amjad, R.A. Long

Young people sample lots of activities in high school, and by the time they graduate each has a unique set of experiences to call their own. We asked three members of Longview’s class of 2018 to share something about their high school careers, a piece of advice and their post-graduation plans.

R.A. Long High School: Intent on STEM

R.A. Long grad Hamzah Amjad

R.A. Long grad Hamzah Amjad

From Hamzah Amjad’s perspective, having technology isn’t enough.

“It can be used to solve most of the world’s problems,” he said. “We just haven’t yet figured out how to help people who need it.”

Hamzah is preparing to do just that. In April, he was among 49 Washington high school seniors—one from each legislative district—who signed letters of intent to pursue careers in STEM—science, technology, engineering and mathematics. In September, he will begin engineering studies at the University of Washington.

“I like things that manifest into real-life scenarios,” he said, describing how his calculus and AP statistics classes helped him see real-world applications for theoretical material.

Hamzah points to medicines that are designed to cure cancer but perhaps aren’t used in the most efficient way. And he mused about artificial intelligence in cars—couldn’t it be used to prevent vehicle accidents?

His teachers anticipate he will make a difference.

“Hamzah is a phenomenal person who is always ‘on his game,’ and he carries himself with a humility that people are drawn to,” said math teacher Paul Jeffries. “He is committed to his future and will be successful, because he doesn’t know how else to be.”

Next steps: Study engineering at University of Washington.

Advice for younger students: “Everyone’s different, so you have to find your own way … but ask for help if you need it.”

Click here to read about Discovery graduate Natalie Rodriguez.

Click here to read about Mark Morris graduate Becky Grubbs.

*

Story originally appeared in the Summer 2018 issue of the Longview Schools Review.

2018-06-21T12:09:40-07:00June 21st, 2018|

LPS graduates take diverse paths: Natalie Rodriguez, Discovery

Young people sample lots of activities in high school, and by the time they graduate each has a unique set of experiences to call their own. We asked three members of Longview’s class of 2018 to share something about their high school careers, a piece of advice and their post-graduation plans.

Discovery High School: Finding her wings

DHS grad Natalie Rodriguez

Discovery grad Natalie Rodriguez

After moving back to Longview from Texas in her sophomore year, Natalie Rodriguez’s plan was to finish high school online so she could avoid people.

Then the self-described “really, really shy” student heard about Discovery, Longview’s alternative high school, and gave it a try.

When Natalie was required to make her first presentation, Discovery teacher Tamra Higgins nudged her through it.

“Ms. Higgins was like, ‘It’ll be OK. You’ll be fine,’” Natalie recalled—and found out she was.

She continued trying new things, including a library science class at R.A. Long and volunteer work at Monticello Middle School. Along the way, she found a passion for libraries.

“I realized if you work in a library, you’re helping people,” she said.
“Libraries are like hospitals for the mind.”

Higgins and English teacher Ron Moore agreed that Natalie has evolved into a whole new student.

“Natalie consistently asked some of the best questions and offered the deepest and most sophisticated insights,” Moore said. “She became a class leader and risk taker—miles away from that timid girl who was hesitant to put her toe in the water.”

Next steps: Start at Lower Columbia College, preparing for a career as a library technician.

Advice for younger students:
“If you’re on a cliff and you need to jump, but you’re too scared to jump, find some wings, staple them on—and just jump.”

Click here to read about Mark Morris graduate Becky Grubbs.

Click here to read about R.A. Long graduate Hamzah Amjad.

*

Story originally appeared in the Summer 2018 issue of the Longview Schools Review.

2018-06-21T14:53:29-07:00June 21st, 2018|
Translate »